The DVSA ADI Standards Check Test

Continued ability to instruct

What is an ADI standards check test?

The approved driving instructor (ADI) standards check test is given to those who've already passed the part 3 examination. If you wish to remain on the approved driving instructor (ADI) register, you must re-take the approved driving instructor (ADI) standards check test at least once during each 4 year period that you're registered as an approved driving instructor (ADI). You will be required to take an approved driving instructor (ADI) standards check test, even if you don’t have a car or aren’t working as an driving instructor if you wish to remain on the approved driving instructor (ADI) register.

The purpose of the approved driving instructor (ADI) standards check test is to check that approved driving instructors (ADIs) are still teaching according the national standards for driver and rider training.

How will I know when I've got an ADI standards check test?

You’ll get an approved driving instructor (ADI) standards check test appointment letter from the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) asking you to go for an approved driving instructor (ADI) standards check test. The letter will say when and where you'll need to go.

You will normally get your first approved driving instructor (ADI) standards check test about 6 months after passing your part 3 test.

How many attempts at the ADI standards check test do I get?

Much like the part 3 test, you'll only get 3 attempts at the approved driving instructor (ADI) standards check test. Failure on the third attempt will result in removal from the approved driving instructor (ADI) register.

Do I have to pay for an ADI standards check test?

There is not an additional fee for the approved driving instructor (ADI) standards check test. The approved driving instructor (ADI) standards check test fee is covered by the fee that you pay for your approved driving instructor (ADI) certificate aka green badge and registration.

Which languages can be used for the ADI standards check test?

You can only take the approved driving instructor (ADI) standards check test in English or Welsh languages.

How long does the ADI standards check test take?

The approved driving instructor (ADI) standards check test takes around 1 hour. You'll need to allow 10 minutes for the supervising examiner (SE) to discuss the result with you at the end of the test, so it's actually only around 50 minutes!

What is the grading system for the ADI standards check test?

The approved driving instructor (ADI) standards check test is divided into three main categories and seventeen sub categories. In order to pass the approved driving instructor (ADI) standards check test, you'll need to score enough points in all three categories. How many points you get, will define whether or not you've passed and your grade.

There are two pass grades for the approved driving instructor (ADI) standards check test; A & B.

How many points do I need to get a grade A on my ADI standards check test?

In order to get a 'Grade A' on your approved driving instructor (ADI) standards check test, you must score between 43-51 points (85%-100%).

How many points do I need to get a grade B on my ADI standards check test?

To get a 'Grade B' on your approved driving instructor (ADI) standards check test, you must score between 31-42 points (61%-84%).

NOTE: You can at anytime request an ADI standards check retest if you believe that your standard has improved and you would like the opportunity to prove it.

What would result in failing the ADI standards check test?

You will fail the approved driving instructor (ADI) standards check test if you:

  • Score less than 31 points (0%-60%)
  • Score 7 or less points in 'risk management' even if you have enough overall points
  • You behave in a way which puts you, the pupil or any third party in immediate danger

Much like the ADI part 3 test, you'll only get 3 attempts at the ADI standards check test. Failure on the third attempt will result in removal from the Approved Driving Instructor (ADI) register.

How does the ADI standards check test points system work?

You will be scored 0-3 points on each sub category. How much you score is based on whether or not you cover the sub category and the standard in which they're covered. The scores from the sub categories will be added up to create a score for their three main categories. The points from these three main categories are added together creating your total score.

Competence standards examples

An ADI who makes no attempt to understand their pupil’s needs would be demonstrating no evidence of competence and be marked 0.

An ADI who makes an attempt, asks a few questions, but doesn’t really listen and then goes ahead and does what they intended to do regardless, would be demonstrating a few elements of competence and would be marked 1.

An ADI who grasps the importance of understanding the pupil’s needs and makes a real effort to do so, but who finds it difficult to frame suitable questions, would be demonstrating competence in most elements and would be marked 2.

An ADI who grasps the importance of understanding the pupil's needs and makes a real effort to do so, and finds it easy to frame suitable questions, would be demonstrating competence in all elements and would be marked 3.

  • No evidence = 0
  • Demostrated in a few elements = 1
  • Demonstrated in most elements = 2
  • Demonstrated in all element = 3

What are the three main categories?

  1. Lesson planning
  2. Risk management
  3. Teaching & learning strategies

What is lesson planning?

Lesson planning is about identifying the learning goals and needs of the pupil. Once you have identified the learning goals and needs of the pupil, you agree on a lesson plan which helps them work towards their learning goals and needs. Now that you have agreed with the pupil on the lesson plan, you must select an appropriate lesson route and be prepared, if appropriate, to adapt the lesson plan and/or route to help them achieve their learning goals and needs.

The four sub categories are:

  1. Identifying the pupil's learning goals and needs
  2. Agreeing an appropriate lesson plan with the pupil
  3. Choosing a suitable lesson route
  4. Adapting the lesson plan when appropriate

Maximum points: 12

What is risk management?

Risk management is about helping the pupil to understand how the risk is shared between themselves and you the driving instructor. Any instructions given should be clear and in good time so that the pupil has time to safely act on what you're saying. As a driving instructor you should be fully aware of the surroundings, the actions of the pupil and of other road users. Any verbal or physical interventions must be timely and appropriate for the circumstances, and an explaination should given for the intervention. You should give feedback where appropriate in order to help the pupil understand any safety critical incidents.

The five sub categories are:

  1. Understanding how the responsibility for risk is be shared
  2. Clarity and timing of directions and instructions
  3. Awareness of the surroundings and the pupil’s actions
  4. Verbal and physical intervention timely and appropriate
  5. Feedback given on potential safety critical incidents

Maximum points: 15

Getting 7 or less points in this category will result in failure!

What is teaching & learning strategies?

Teaching and learning strategies is about matching the teaching style and level to the needs and ability of the pupil. You should use the Q&A technique where appropriate to help the pupil analyse any driver errors and encourage them to take responsibility for their learning. Where possible, you should use opportunities or examples to clarify outcomes with the pupil. Any technical information given should be comprehensive, appropriate and accurate at a level the pupil will understand. You should give appropriate and timely feedback to the pupil throughout the lesson in order to help them with their learning goals and needs. When asked, answer the pupils questions correctly and in a timely manner. You must be non-discriminatory towards the pupil at all times during the lesson. At the end of the lesson you should get the pupil to reflect back on the lesson by asking them how they feel they had performed during the lesson and discuss future goals and needs.

The eight sub categories are:

  1. Matching the teaching style to the pupil’s learning style and ability
  2. Encouraging the pupil to analyse problems and take responsibility for their learning
  3. Using opportunities and examples to clarify learning outcomes
  4. Giving technical information comprehensively, appropriately and accurately
  5. Giving appropriate and timely feedback throughout the lesson
  6. Following up and answering any pupil queries
  7. Maintaining a non-discriminatory manner throughout the lesson
  8. Reflective recap of the pupils performance and setting goals

Maximum points: 24

Standards Check Form SC1 - Example

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